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Game AI in Social Media

Alex J. Champandard on October 6, 2008

At AiGameDev.com we’re always looking for new ways to help you connect with other people involved in game AI, and of course, with information on the subject in general. Obviously, you know about the blog (RSS), the Game AI Forums and our new Game AI Wiki. But what you may not know about is all the stuff we’ve been doing in the background!

Live Q&A Sessions — Streaming Audio / Video

Firstly, there’s a double Marathon Q&A on October 7th or October 8th: “Almost Everything You Wanted to Know about Game AI”, with me. Based on the previous feedback, these sessions seem to be really useful and interesting, so here’s your chance to see what all the fuss is about. Pick the session that fits your timezone best:

  • Session 1 — 6 P.M. (Europe), 5 P.M. (U.K. Time), Noon (East Coast), other timezones.

  • Session 2 — Midnight (Europe), 11 P.M. (U.K. Time), 6 P.M. (East Coast), other timezones.

You can find all the details here: http://live.aigamedev.com. We’ll most likely cover similar topics in both sessions, but there may be differences based on the questions and the audience.

Professional Network — LinkedIn

If you have a profile on LinkedIn, you might be interested in joining our Game AI Developers group. Like with most activity on LinkedIn, this group will be a little more professional, and networking oriented.

Technical Videos — YouTube

Many videos about game AI and animation papers are hard to find, so we centralized them and put them all on YouTube. The result is what we call Game AI TV, which currently has 46 technical videos which describe ideas implemented in white papers.

Casual Networking — Facebook

Petra also started a group on Facebook. Don’t expect the kind of in-depth discussions that you’ll find in the forums here, but it’ll be a good way to keep up-to-date with the various activities going on both at AiGameDev.com and in the Game AI community in general.

Stream of Consciousness — Twitter

This one is an acquired taste, but those of you that are on Twitter can follow the Behind the Scenes story about our work on AiGameDev.com. I primarily post stuff related to the site or game AI… You heard first about Paris ‘09 here!

Talk Back!

If you have any suggestions of other social media channels that you would like to interact in, let us know and we’ll see what we can do.

Discussion 6 Comments

RobinB on October 6th, 2008

I'd love to have a general chat, preferably IRC.

zoombapup on October 6th, 2008

As long as we dont jump on the "Second Life" bandwagon :) Actually, maybe we can jump in to a gameserver. I'll see what I can hookup. I could make a nice little Torque playground for chatting stuff. Maybe see if I can host it at home.

alexjc on October 6th, 2008

[B]Robin,[/B] I [URL="http://talk.aigamedev.com/"]thought about IRC[/URL] too, especially after the first Q&A when the chat was so active. I do like the idea also... But somehow I'm a little worried it might take away some emphasis from the forums, which are a better place to record information. Any ideas about that? [B]Phil,[/B] I'm not sure about game interaction either. Second Life or any other for that matter! Alex

RobinB on October 6th, 2008

I was thinking of a very simple interface as well, i.e., IRC. I think forums and chats have a large, distinct area of usefulness, but also some overlap. It is much easer discuss difficult or elaborate topics such as implementation details, papers, and architectures on a forum. Plus, information is persistent, so its better suited for announcements, and stuff that requires experts (which might only show up once a week). OTOH, chats are better for offtopic talk and socializing. However, I can see the danger that good ideas are created through brainstorming and don't get transfered to the forum. But then again, they probably wouldnt be created without the imediate replies of a chat in the first place.

p_cp on October 10th, 2008

I agree with Phil. Please, no Second Life!

zoombapup on October 10th, 2008

There is some benefit to having some examples take place in an actual game world though, one which is networked where people can spectate etc. For instance, ideas around pathfinding are usually interesting etc when they can be shown "live". Its relatively easy to throw a networked environment together with Torque to demonstrate some parts of this at least. In theory you could also use some kind of ventrilo/teamspeak thing to do the chatting/voice presentation too.

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